In Buddhism the Vajra / Dorje is the symbol of Vajrayana, one of the three major branches of Buddhism. Vajrayana is translated as "Thunderbolt Way” or "Diamond Way" and can imply the thunderbolt experience of Buddhist enlightenment or Bodhi. It also implies indestructibility, just as diamonds are harder than other gemstones.

 

The vajra and ghanta (bell) are used in many rites by lamas. The dorje is a male polysemic symbol that represents many things for the tantrika. The vajra is representative of upaya whereas its companion tool, the bell which is a female symbol, denotes prajna. Some deities are shown holding each the vajra and bell in separate hands, symbolizing the union of the forces of wisdom and compassion, respectively.

 

Vajra, Tibetan is dorje. In Sanskrit, the word Vajra means both thunderbolt and diamond. Vajra was also the son of Aniruddha and great grandson of Shri Krishna As a material device, the vajra is a ritual object, a short metal weapon—originally a kind of fist-iron like Japanese yawara—that has the symbolic nature of a diamond (it can cut any substance but not be cut itself) and that of the thunderbolt (irresistible force). The vajra is believed to represent firmness of spirit and spiritual power. It is a ritual tool or spiritual implement which is symbolically used by Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism, all of which are traditions of Dharma. Because of its symbolic importance, the vajra spread along with Indian religion and culture to other parts of Asia. It was used as both a weapon and a symbol in Nepal, India, Tibet, Bhutan, Siam, Cambodia, Myanmar, China, Korea and Japan.

 

 
 


 
   
 
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